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Photo Credit: Forest and Kim Starr

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Photo Credit: Forest and Kim Starr

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Photo Credit: Forest and Kim Starr

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QUICK FACTS

  • HPRWA SCORE -12
  • SYNONYMS
  • ELEVATION RANGE Low
  • FAMILY Moraceae
  • PLANT TYPE Large tree
  • WATER REQUIRMENTS Requires water until established
  • SOIL REQUIRMENTS Tolerates many soil types
  • SUN EXPOSURE Full sun to Partial sun
  • SALT TOLERANCE Highly salt tolerant
  • DRAINAGE REQUIRED Requires good drainage
  • PROPAGATION METHODS Vegetative (grafting or layering)

Artocarpus altilis
(breadfruit, 'ulu)

Native to the south Pacific, ‘Ulu arrived in Hawaii with the first Polynesians. This handsome tree has a long history of introduction and cultivation in tropical areas. The migrating Polynesians spread ‘ulu around the Pacific arena while European explorers brought the food source to the Atlantic. A seeded variety was introduced to the French West Indies by the French navigator Sonnerat in 1772. In the late 1700’s about 2,000 seedless plants were brought to Jamaica from Tahiti, at the same time the Spaniards were spreading the tree throughout Latin America. Pacific Islanders cultivated different varieties to ensure yearlong fruit production. Today hundreds of cultivars exist, both seeded and seedless, coming in many shapes, sizes and fruiting seasons with the ability to thrive in a wide range of conditions from coral atolls to well-drained fertile soil. To germinate: sow fresh seeds in moist soil, germination takes place in a few weeks. Most cultivars in Hawaii are the seedless, propagation requires air layers or root cuttings. Wound the roots at the soil surface to induce new offspring, wait until the sucker is 18 inches tall with a healthy root system before separation for the parent tree.

Plant Uses

  • Specimen
  • Shade
  • Medicinal
  • Cultural significance
  • Edible
  • Woodworking

Dangers

None